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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Wednesday - Autumn Textures

Wednesday Vignette is hosted by Anna at Flutter and Hum.  Flutter on over to her blog to see her vignette this week. 


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

For a Good Time, Call Alison Part One; Barone Garden

On Saturday night, I stopped by the gas station near my house to fuel up for the week and a large flat bed truck pulled up behind me marked "Barone." The bed of the truck was empty but I recognized the driver from a recent visit, with my pal Alison, to Barone Garden .  The driver, with whom I had a nice chat, assured me that they are happy to deliver just about anywhere in the Puget Sound region.  I'm seeing these pictures with fresh eyes since I'm no longer limited to what would squeeze into the plant mobile.

Barone has one of the largest collections of garden decor in the area and it's always a joy to see their ever-changing inventory.


A hydrant for every dog!

By the way, in case you haven't heard, Fleur de lis garden statuary in Seattle will be closing by the end of December as they haven't found another location.  Everything in stock is now 50% off.   Back to Barone - There's something for every garden style.


Granite spheres

Bridges large and small

Jurassic Park?

The selection of fountains and bird baths is unrivaled.  Amusing bird bath.



Not really my style but gorgeous outdoor fireplace.

Oh those metallic gold pots.

One of these hose pots almost came home with me.  Wouldn't one look awesome with a large agave growing in it?

If there were only space in my bamboo grove for one of these, it might have jumped into the car. 


"Hare Rising"  or hare raising?

Catfish.

I'd not seen this take on the Gunnera-leaf fountain before.

What would you put in those holes?  Succulents come immediately to mind. 

Stepping stones 



Handsome German Shepherds.

I love these natural-looking water catchers and I'd imagine that the birds are fairly fond of them as well.


Both Alison and I fell hard for this gorgeous pot.  It would have jumped in the car immediately if it weren't so large and I could think of a place for it in my garden.

The price was very reasonable.  Alison may go back for this later. 

Handsome.

Someone's got a big head!

Appealing simple lines.

Even a nice selection of steel planters. 


Faux stone fire pit surround. 

This guy's not amused. 

Most of the fountains were in part sun/part shadow and were difficult to photograph.  There were hundreds of different styles.

So much to think about. 

This lady, who looks like she could be a fragment of a fancy historic building facade, did jump into the plant mobile.
Alison also found something special but we'll have to watch her blog to see if she posts about it.  Stay tuned for more from our fun day of garden shopping.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

In a Vase on Monday - Water World

 Last weekend, Alison and I went nursery hopping and I brought home more dried hydrangeas. Alison said that they'd make an easy vase some Monday and since venturing outside on a cold and wet Sunday afternoon wasn't particularly appealing, I decided to cheat a bit and use what was already inside.  This vase from Paris was purchased years ago at a shop in Alaska and seemed just right for the hydrangeas. (The name hydrangea comes from the Greek "hydor," meaning water, and "angos," meaning jar or vessel.)  Notice the stingray pattern


There were some dried miscanthus and lunaria annua seed heads hanging around so they got thrown in as well.

Joining the arrangement is this undersea looking vase from West Seattle Nursery. 

In a Vase on Monday is hosted by the dedicated and creative Cathy at Rambling in the Garden who has created a "Rhapsody in Green" this week while I'm still singing the blues.   Click here to join in the fun!

Friday, November 17, 2017

Looking for the Past

The demolition of Tacoma's Scottish Rite Temple/ Bible Presbyterian Church about which I posted here and here, is complete and as I drive by the space once occupied by the building, there's just a fenced hole in the ground.  The heavy equipment is gone and the site will soon be busy with construction.  For a few weeks, I stopped by every day after school to see the progress.



This feels a little like watching the garden shutting down for the winter.  (Although, we know that winter is a busy time for plant life but most of that activity is happening underground.)





Kitty corner from the site is this beautiful older apartment building and a new 175 unit apartment building nearing completion.

What songs were played, what joys and pains expressed and  shared at this keyboard? 



I was very tempted to "accidentally" push through the fence to rescue this fragment of the building facade.


The heart of the building? 


Even this rubble is now gone.

Death makes way for rebirth in our gardens and in our communities. 



These fragments were carefully set aside.





Second Use Building Materials has some of the salvaged bits from the building including a couple of really interesting masonic pieces and beautiful tongue and groove flooring.  Someone also rescued some incredible old growth huge beams.  Being in the mood to look at salvaged materials, I stopped by Earthwise Salvage the other day.

For me there's a wistful feeling looking at these fragments that were for many years part of lives, loves, events.  Pieces of places called home.

I'm totally in love with this sink but am not sure where it would fit in my garden.  There is an upstairs bathroom in our house that needs to be rescued from a 1970's remodel & this might work there.

Fabulous in a huge loft apartment as a functional room divider...




Those light fixtures on the top shelf back there would be interesting planters.

What would Loree do?  Really big saucer planters?




Sometimes, it's best to let go of the past.
Have a good weekend all!